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Posts Tagged ‘blue’

I walked into my master bedroom a couple weeks ago and thought, “BLECH.”.  Not that I haven’t loved the black and white neutral color scheme, I just got tired of it.  I blame it on the quarter-life crisis I seem to be going through.  I have been feeling very anxious and OLD and have been itching to mix it up a bit in my life.  I would do what I always do when I feel like this and just go and do something drastic to my hair, that usually seems to do the trick, but I PROMISED my hubby I would grow my hair out and wouldn’t cut it until it was about “boob length” (his words).  So, after flipping through my “Happy Chic” book by Jonathan Adler (it is so fun and dramatic),

I decided to spruce up my room with a younger, funkier, Jonathan Adler meets Domino Mag (I miss you Domino) vibe and some really happy colors. The problem, like usual, is that I don’t have much of a decorating budget so I had to get creative and try to use what I have as much as possible.  I knew the first thing I wanted to do is change the wall color.  I decided to keep it neutral and lighten it up so I went with a light gray.  This decision was also largely based on the fact that I happen to have a bunch of leftover gray paint from Peyton’s room that I knew I could lighten up and use.  I also knew I really wanted to make the walls come to life so I decided to take it one step further and paint subtle gray horizontal stripes on 3 of the 4 walls.  I thought this would be a BIG time consuming job, but it actually wasn’t that bad.  And the lines came out really crisp, even on my textured walls, thanks to this tutorial I found over at Living With Lindsay.  I did this all by myself so I imagine it would be much easier with a helper.  I figure my husband will be less annoyed by my constant redecorating if he doesn’t have to do any of the work, so I do things while hes not looking so he can be amazed at the result later! 😉  Anyway, my stripes are 11.5″ wide.  I simply measured from the baseboard up 11.5″, then marked it, and measured up another 11.5″, marked it again, so on…until I had marked off the whole 3 walls, putting marks every 4 feet or so.  Then I just layed the tape on the wall as straight as possible from mark to mark.  I’m sure its not perfect, but I’m impatient.  I think it turned out pretty dang straight actually.  I left the tall wall, opposite my bed, stripeless because A. The weird ceiling line would’ve made the stripes look off at the top, and B.  I decided to put bookshelves against that wall that would pretty much cover it anyway.

Well, I’ll just show you the pics and walk you through the rest of what I did….

As a reminder, heres what my master bedroom looked like before:

And heres what it looks like now!  SO much more fun and fresh I think.  And it definitely is a better reflection of me and Mr. Hubby’s style:

Didn’t the stripes turn out great?  I super love the subtle little FUN they bring to the walls.  So obviously with practically NO budget I kept all the original furniture.  The first and most noticeable upcycle is probablly the DIY’d ikat chevron headboard.  Yup.  I made that baby.  I looked and looked for cheap fabric that I liked and just couldn’t find any so I hit up Walmart’s fabric section and found some great white cotton twill.  Then all it took was a little craft paint, mixed with some textile medium, and a bit of creativity.  To be honest, I like but don’t love it.  I was too impatient and so my lines are a bit whompy.  I have leftover fabric so I might just do it again.  I dunno.  Anyway, the tutorial on that is coming soon if you want to paint your own!  (I’m sure you’ll learn from my mistakes and do a better job!)

I was happy to keep my lime green chairs and create a pallet around them so I distributed pops of green around the room.  But I also LOVE tealy-blue and threw that in there too, spray painting the nightstands, and adding other teal accents around the room.  Then I wanted just a little bit more so I added in just a few PUNCHES of tangerine orange.  It was tough to break out for my “4 colors in a room” box but I figured since gray, black, and white are really just neutrals in the background, 3 more fun colors wouldn’t hurt.  🙂

The black frames used in the pic above I got from BigLots for $5 for 2 (I also saw the same ones at Joann’s for $20 for 2 so I got a killer deal).  I just wrote on some canvas panels the letters to spell “ME” and “YOU” and flanked the room with them to fill up all the extra wall space surrounding my bed.

I debated for a bit on what to hang above my bed.  I didn’t want anything too busy to compete with the vibrant headboard and striped wall.  I thought about putting the framed “Me” and “YOU” there but decided I wanted something a bit more simple and small.  Also, I was afraid Daniel would think the room was getting too girly so I thought I’d throw him one and macho the place up by stealing the antlers (thrifted and painted for $4) from Sawyer’s nursery and mount those above the bed instead.  (Don’t worry, I just replaced them with the Pinterest project from this post and my wire dear head looks great in there).  I LOVE them in here.  I think they float perfectly inbetween my DIY’d hanging lamps and give just that touch of bohemian but in a sophisticated way.  Daniel likes them too.  Mostly because he says, “The bedroom is meant for mounting.”  Haha!  😉

Okay, I just wanted to talk about these pillows really quick!  Little orange guy is just some fabric I have wrapped around a pillow right now but I will soon get to sewing.  But the big gorgeous fringed beauty I found the other day at Home Goods in the clearance section for $7.  YES  $7.  You can’t even buy a down pillow form at the fabric store for $7.  I just love it.

This is all pretty much the same.  I still want to do something more to that dresser.  Not sure what though, but it works great the way it is too.  The little teal lamp was on sale at Target for about $20.  The picture frame was also a Target buy on clearance for $2 as well as the new duvet cover set that was (my big splurge) about $60.

Above is a quick look from the other side of the room.  Below is a look at my bookcase wall that once was my gallery wall.  I ordered the white bookshelves from Walmart (in store they only had the 11″ deep ones and I wanted the 9″ deep ones) for $35 each.  They did site to store so I didn’t have to pay any shipping.  Originally I wanted to back them with some fun fabric or wallpaper (probably something black and white to allow the decorative accents to pop) but once I assembled them and got them up I realized I rather like them backless with the gray wallcolor showing through.  I’m not sure if I’ll leave them this way or decide to go ahead and back them, but here they are for now.  I’m still working on the styling, but heres the gist:

I am also debating on building legs for my shelves to stand on to make them look a bit more custom and give them more height on my tall wall.  I dunno.  I’ll probably just be too lazy. 🙂  Most of the accent pieces on the shelves were things I already had although I did pick up a few colorful vases and such at Hobby Lobby (50% off) and Ross.  I probably bought about 6 things all under $6 each.

And thats pretty much it!  I LOVE my new colorful funky room, and so does the hubby which is always a plus.  😉  I also mixed up some leftover paint from Sawyer’s nursery and am going to be painting my master bathroom shortly in a tealy-blue color.  Of course I’ll post it when I get to it!

A completely new look for under $300!  So happy.  So chic. 🙂

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Yay!  I’m so excited to FINALLY have my craft room/office/music/guest room decorated and ready to use! Heres a bad picture that sort of gives you the idea of what it used to look like.  Sorry, I didn’t take many before pics.

As you can see,  this just shows you one side of the room where I housed all my craft junk.  Although it was somewhat organized into labeled bins, it looked super cluttered and chaotic.  The other side of the room had a small rickety computer desk and my keyboard on it.  And that was pretty much it.  Oh, by the way, if you read my sunburst mirror tutorial I described the “decorated” version of this room with the diarrhea wall color.  The pic above is before I painted it back then.  Sorry, I don’t have a pic of the ugly “decorated” room (I’m trying to block it from my memory).

Anyway, we really needed to be able to use this room as my craft room, our office, our music room to house my keyboard and our recording equipment, and a guest room for when family comes to visit from Idaho.  Thats a lot to ask of a relatively small space.  I sat in the room with a paper and pencil for like 20 minutes before I came up with a functional solution.  I decided the crappy desk had to go in order to free up that wall for a day-bed with trundle for guests.  That meant I’d have to reconfigure the shelving (thanks Daddy for putting it up for me!) and build a desk area on that side of the room.  This made my hubby happy when he saw it complete and realized how much extra desk space it created.  I also needed to fit my keyboard in there along with my drop-leaf craft table.  So the keyboard went on the wall by the closet door, I organized and put shelving in the closet to free up the floorspace which allows me now to be able to roll my craft table in there when I’m not using it, and I also brought an old bookcase that was in our garage in with some baskets to house guests’ items and create a little vanity area with a mirror and lamp.  And voila!! It is done.  And BONUS, my husband caved and agrees that it now looks much better and is much more functional.  Heres what it looks like now:

Awwww.  Much better.

The wooden day-bed and trundle were a $50 craigslist find and fit perfectly on the back wall.  I bought the white twin bedskirt at Target as well as the white comforter.

I REALLY needed some functional storage for all my craft supplies.  I found these photo boxes at Hobby Lobby for $4 each but I bought them on a 50% off day for $2 a piece.  Think outside the box (no pun intended) when looking for organizational supplies.  Office storage boxes like these were at least $6 each in the office supply section of the other stores I visited.   In the bottom left you can see some of my white stackable bins that I keep on the bottom shelf to store things I need often like scizzors, glue, markers, tools, etc, and I found them as a set of 3 at Walmart in the kitchen section.

Heres a peek at the “office” side.  Peyton really wanted to be in the picture.

A few Dollar Store clipboards got a makeover with ModPodge and scrapbook paper and keep our mail organized.

This frame was a quick project:  Take an old frame, paint it, attach wire or string across it in rows (I used push pins to hold it to the frame), and clip on small clothespins.  It makes a cute little photo/memo board.

This is my DIY mirror and a lamp that was needing a home.  I spray painted the lamp Jade from Krylon and sanded it back a little to distress it a bit.  I wanted a little place where guests could get ready and put some belongings.

These are the pen and ink sketches from this tutorial.  I bought the frames at the Dollar Store.

I layered tons of fun pillows on the day-bed which I just took from other places in my house.  I also took a paper lantern from my son’s room (he already had another lamp in there) and spruced it up a bit with some fabric flowers.  The tutorial for that is coming soon.  I bought an ugly painting a while back at a thrift store for $5 solely for the frame and painted the frame and a picture to go inside and hung it over the bed.

Here is a close up of the painting I did.  I wanted something kind of fun and quirky with just a POP of color.  I sketched the picture on a white canvas board (find canvas for really cheap at Walmart and BigLots) and then gave it a watercolored look with watered down acrylic craft paint.  I like that its imperfect and kind of whimsical.  The dusty blue-green fram makes it really pop off the white wall.  I spray painted the frame with Jade paint from Krylon and then glazed over it with watered down black craft paint and wiped it back before it dried with a paper towel.  Then I just set it all with a clear gloss spray lacquer.

I spruced up this lamp with singed fabric flowers I made and I think it really gives it a little more oomph.

This chalkboard was made by spray painting the old backing to a mirror (regular spray paint in a matte or satin finish works GREAT as a chalkboard on a smooth surface).  I decorated it with a white paint pen and hung it off of some silver chain I had.

And thats pretty much it!! It actually looks much better in person and I am loving the results!  I’m so excited to start using this room more now and my hubby is excited that craft junk will no longer be inhabiting the dining room table!  🙂

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I know I said I’d show you guys how to do this so I finally am!  Sorry about the wait, but I think you’ll find it was worth it!  This is a BEAUTIFUL and easy DIY accessorie project that will “wow” everyone who sees you wear it.  This necklace is especially befitting for the spring (I LOVE SPRING!!) and I figured since it is Easter this weekend it will be the perfect compliment to your Easter ensemble.  The thing I like most about this project is that it is cheap (of course) and unique in that each rose turns out a bit different and you can customize the colors to any you’d like.  So lets just jump into it then shall we!

Cost: $0 for me (since I had everything on hand) but about $8-$15 depending on what you already have

Supplies:

  • A set of jewelry making tools (round nose pliers, wire cutters, flat nosed pliers).  I got mine at Walmart in a set of 3 for about $7.
  • Sculpey Clay.  Or other polymer clay of your choice.  They have a huge variety of colors for about $2 per block.  I usually stock up when they go on sale for half off.  I typically get the primary colors plus black, white, and brown and then mix them myself to whatever I need.
  • Acrylic craft paint.  I like to use brown, and sometimes metallic gold and silver to get the vintage/antique look to my roses.
  • A craft knife or utility knife.
  • A bead reamer or a skewer.
  • A medium paint brush.
  • Paper towels.
  • A water dish.
  • A palette.  I use a plate covered in tin foil.
  • A glass baking pan.
  • An oven.
  • 5-9 medium to large size beads in a coordinating color to your rose color pick.
  • Jewelry chain, jump rings, clasps, and eye pins.

If you’re serious about making jewelry its worth it to get familiar with the basic techniques to jewelry making.  I am honestly not a pro at all but found that a lot can be done with my cheap supplies and tools and some basic techniques.  Also, on a side note, I get a lot of my jewelry findings at The Dollar Store, Walmart, and my local craft store when they’re half off so its really not that expensive a hobby to have.  And its nice to have some supplies on hand to whip up last minute gifts for friends and family that are classy and handmade and look way more expensive than they actually were to make.

To help you out on this front, heres a link to a great site that will teach you the basics you’ll need to complete this project as well as help you with future jewelry making endeavors.  And if you need a little more to get you started, heres a couple more sites I found that I thought were clear and concise: http://www.jewelry-making- instructions.com/beaded-links.html ,http://www.making-jewelry-now.com/jewelry-making-instructions.html .  There, seriously easy huh?  With just those simple skills and your Walmart tools you can make literally hundreds of amazing pieces of jewelry.  Now to the part I’m going to really teach today.  How to make the vintage inspired clay rose bead that is going to completely MAKE this necklace.  Ready?  Here we go.

  1. Decide what color(s) you’d like to make your rose.  When I do this project I usually make a few different color options and do them at the same time just to make it worth the effort and to use as “give-aways” to my friends (cuz you know they’re going to want what you’ve got when they see your awesome necklace).
  2. If needed, mix your clay to get your desired color.  If for some reason you missed kindergarten and first grade and never learned how to “mix” colors, refer to a color chart.  I mixed red, blue, and white to get my pastel purple colored clay, green, yellow, blue, and white to get my turquoise colored clay, and white and yellow to get my pastel yellow clay.  Or you could just take the easy road and buy the exact color you’d like since they have plenty of color options at the craft stores to suit your needs.  Although if you forgo the color mixing, you still might want to work and knead your clay to make it a little softer and more pliable to work with.
  3. Once you’re clay feels pliable enough and is the desired color, pull off a small section and roll it into a ball (about the size of a pea).  Then using your fingers, smoosh that ball of clay flat and smooth (but not too thin since you want your rose petals to be durable after baking) to form a small disk of clay.
  4. Next, roll one of the edges of that clay disk in towards the other edge to form your rose center.  Don’t smoosh it together too much since you want the edges somewhat loose to peel down and turn a bit to make them look a bit more realistic.  Heres what you should be aiming for:
  5. Don’t worry if its not perfect.  If you don’t like your rose center, just reform it into a disk and start again.  You’ll get the hang of it soon and then you can set your center aside and work on the outer petals by using the same idea; start with a portion of clay (a bit larger than pea sized now), roll it into a ball, and smoosh it into a disk.
  6. Now we form the rest of the rose by taking these disk-like “petals” and wrapping them around the rose, overlapping the rose center’s seam like so:
  7. See how it is already starting to look like a rose?  To make the petals more “real”, pinch, pull, and bend the edges of the petals up and/or down to get that life-like effect.
  8. Now continue making your petal disks and wrapping them around the center being sure to somewhat overlap them and being careful to make larger petals as the rose grows outward.Don’t worry about the excess clay that is underneath.  I use it to hold on to as I work and then cut it off with a utility knife before I bake it.
  9. Continue working your clay petals around the rose until it is the desired size and fullness that you like.
  10. What do you think?  Aren’t you amazed at how easy that was!  Now take out your utility knife or craft knife and gently carve off the clay “stem” that you’re holding on to.  I try to make my roses pretty flat in the back so that they aren’t too bulky on the necklace and have less of a tendency to flip around while wearing it.
  11. Try not to handle the rose too much on top since you want to maintain the look of your petals and not accidentally squish your pretty flower too much.
  12. Next, take your bead reamer or your skewer (toothpick or needle works too), and create a hole through the base of your rose from one end to the next to allow it to be strung onto an eye pin later.
  13. Lay your little rose bud beads out on a glass cooking dish and heat your home oven to 275 degrees (or whatever the clay package suggests).
  14. Bake your clay roses according to the time suggested on the clay packaging.  I use Sculpey clay and usually bake around 6-12 roses at once at 275 degrees for about 12 minutes.  The package says 15 minutes for 1/4 inch clay but I like to somewhat “under-cook” my clay roses so that they are a tiny bit rubbery and not too brittle when they’re cool.  I just have found that it makes them a little bit more durable and lets face it, you are not going to want your new work of art to fall apart on your neck later!
  15. Let your clay roses cool completely.You can see I made some smaller roses to use as rings later if I feel like it.
  16. At this point you can use your rose as a bead and wire it to a necklace, you can coat it with a glossy finishing spray, or you can continue on to find out how to antique it a bit (which is what I prefer.  I think it just gives it a little something extra and makes it more unique).
  17. Prepare your antiquing supplies.  Heres how I set mine up:You can see I have my coordinating beads picked out (this helps me decide what colors, and how much, “antiquing” I want to do), my water glass to dilute my paint and rinse my brush in, my painting palette with squirts of my “antiquing” colors on it, another foil wrapped plate to set my wet roses on to dry, and my paper towels to wipe off the excess paint.
  18. For these three colors of roses I chose to use a goldy-brown metallic craft paint and a darker brown flat craft paint to give my roses the vintage look I wanted.  To do this, wet your brush and generously dilute your metallic color and simply wash it over the entire rose, being sure to get it into every nook and cranny, and then while the paint is still wet, use your paper towel to rub off the excess.  This will just ever so slightly tinge the petals a shimmery gold with a heavier application in the crevices.
  19. Once that first coat of paint has dried somewhat, do the same technique using the darker brown.  This will allow the paint to seep into the crevices of the petals and give the flower dimension and depth as well as slightly stain the rose an antique-brown tone.  You can do this multiple times if you’d like, applying your diluted brown paint with the paint brush to the entire rose and then wiping off the excess to allow the original color to come through and leaving a brown paint deposit in the crevices.  Heres a look at what I did with the brown and the gold paint:After it was covered in the diluted paint I wiped off the excess to get this result:Not a HUGE difference but it actually adds a lot of character to the once flat looking rose.
  20. Once you get the desired antiqued effect you’re going for you can just let your pretty roses dry while you work on assembling your necklace using the basic techniques you learned from the links at the beginning of this tutorial.  Oh and just so you can see the difference, heres a look at what the “antiqued” roses look like compared to the non-painted roses:And heres a look at how I assembled my necklace:
  21. Basically what you want to do is pick out an odd number of coordinating beads (an odd number so that a middle bead falls in the middle of the necklace instead of a space), and link them together using eye pins and the wire looping technique you now know.  This will be the center of your necklace.  The rose will be asymmetrical when alls said and done.
  22. Then, using an eye pin and the same looping technique, slide the eye pin through the roses beading hole you gave it and attach it to one end of your beaded chain. For this necklace I used large brown pearls and antiqued brass eye pins and chain to play off the turquoise antiqued rose.
  23. Finally, finish off your necklace by measuring out your chain, attaching the clasp to the center to get the thing on and off, and attaching the chain to your beaded chain and rose.  TIP:  I think this necklace looks the most flattering when the rose sits right along or right under your collar-bone, so adjust the length of your chain accordingly.

There you go folks!! Are you amazed by the beautiful thing you’ve just created?! Believe me, you won’t be the only one!  Be sure to make extras since I guarantee there will be some jealous friends wanting a look-a-like asap!  I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and had fun making this awesome necklace!  Play around a bit and create some more wonderful pieces…maybe earrings or a ring to match?  And definitely take the time to learn those basics.  I use those simple techniques a lot when I make jewelry and they’re sure to show up in later tutorials!  Alright then!  Have fun crafting and stay tuned for my next special holiday tutorial; “How to Make a “Hopped Up” Easter T-shirt for You or Your Little Ones”!

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So sorry to everyone who has been waiting for a new post!  I had family in town and some pregnancy issues and just couldn’t get to my blog like I would’ve liked to last week.

First I want to show off how my baby boy nursery is coming along and the projects that have gone into creating it.  Heres a look at the nursery “BEFORE”:…and another:And heres what it looks like now:

(Remember the fabric artwork?  Doesn’t it look great in here!)And heres a close up of the little stuffed owl I made out of a hand towel and scrap fabric:And heres a better look at the easy DIY leaf lamp my little sis and I made out of polar fleece and an old lamp shade:The baby quilt was I made from a $4 bath towel, white polar fleece, and scrap fabric.  I just used the scrap fabric to applique birch trees that mimic the wall mural.  You can also get a look at the block printed bird pillow I made.And finally, heres the Alphabet Pillow that I will be showing you how to make right now.Theres still a lot I want to do in the nursery.  The drapes need to be hung (I’ll be using a tree branch as the curtain rod), I need to make the baby mobile (I’ll be using branches and wood craft cutouts of woodland creatures), once we pick out a name for this little guy I’d like to make some sort of name banner over the crib, and I’m in the process of crocheting a rag rug for the floor.  But, I’m loving the way its turning out so far.  My hubby was hesitant (I don’t get why he still doesn’t trust me) when he saw the aqua wall colors (he thought they were “too girly”), but once the mural was on the wall and the antlers were hung over the changing table, he was in love.  Now I catch him just sitting in the room with the lamp on, rocking in the chair.  Preparing the nursery has really made us both excited for baby boy #2.

Anyway, like I said, I’ll be showing you guys how to make the alphabet pillow today, but let me know if there are any other projects from the room that you’d like me to write a tutorial on and I’d be happy to share all of it with you.

So lets get started on this crazy easy pillow! Heres the breakdown:

Cost: Mine cost $0 to make since I had everything on hand already.  But if you don’t have everything I’d estimate the project will cost between $10-$15.

Supplies:

  • A white pillow (or pillow cover; check out Ikea for plain throw pillow covers in various shapes, sizes, and colors).  My pillows were actually pillow inserts that were meant to be covered but I just simply unstuffed them and then sewed them back up when I was done printing my letters on them.
  • Medium to large foam alphabet stamps.  I got mine at Michaels a while back and they are double sided with the capital letter on one side and the lower case letter on the other.  Any font will work as long as it is not TOO busy and easy to read.
  • Fabric paint in two colors that coordinate with the color scheme in the room.  I did this project obviously for my baby room which is in aqua and orange but I also think it would be smashing in a library or family room in more sophisticated colors.
  • Paper or cardstock to put inside the pillow case to prevent the paint from seeping through.
  • Foam brush to apply the paint to the stamp.
  • Iron to heat set the paint when dry.

And that is seriously it!  So easy and I bet you have a lot of this stuff on hand or you know a crafty friend who’d let you use hers.  Ready to go then?  Lets do this!

  1. Cut a hole big enough to get the stuffing out of the pillow along the seam of one of the sides of the pillow if you’re like me and using a pillow you already have.  If you have a pillow cover, simply lay it flat on the table and insert your pieces of cardstock.  Be sure to have enough cardstock in there to cover the entire portion that you’ll be stamping to prevent seepage (what a lovely word “seepage” is…ugh).
  2. Organize your stamps in alphabetical order so that you can work quickly and easily.
  3. Squirt your fabric paint colors onto your painting pallet (I use a plate covered in tin foil as my pallet).
  4. Okay, nows where you can decide how “perfect” you’d like your pillow to be.  Like I’ve said before, I like imperfect projects because I don’t have the patience to “perfect” them so I simply found the center of my pillow, decided how many letters I’d like on each row, and went for it.  But if you’d like something less “handmade” looking I suppose you could use a ruler and painters tape to tape off your rows like writing paper to insure that everything is straight.  If you are lacking the confidence to just “go for it”, I suggest that when you stamp your first pair of letters (a “pair” meaning the capital and the lower case) you do the pair that is going to be in the center of your pillow.  That will give you a good starting point to work the rest of your alphabet around.  Basically, step 4 is just to decide how you’d like to lay out your letters.  Heres my finished pillow again to give you a reference point:You can see I did 4 letters across and 6 letters down with the “Y” and the “Z” in the center at the bottom.  Based on the size of your pillow and the size of your stamps, you can play around with the layout to find which you’d like best.
  5. Once you got a plan of action you can now decide which letters you’d like to POP out by using the second accent color.  I was originally just going to choose random letters throughout the alphabet to paint in orange (my accent color) but then my little sister Jenna came up with the brilliant idea to spell “F-O-X” with my accent letters.  I thought it was great since the letters happened to fall in such a way that your eye read them as “fox” and that it was inkeeping with my woodsy theme for the room.  You can try doing a word like this or just accent random letters.  Whatever you decide, I love the look of just a few simple letters standing out on the pillow like this.
  6. Once you’ve decided, its time to get stamping!  Are you ready for this?  The trick is to wet the letter stamp with not too much and not too little paint and to quickly and firmly press straight down onto your fabric and pull up.  If you press at an angle or move you’ll smudge your letters so it might be a good idea to practice a few letters on some scrap fabric until you feel like you got the hang of it.  Heres my craft stamps I used to do this project.  (Sorry its kind of upside down but you get the idea).And heres a look at my pillow halfway complete.  A little skeewampus but I guess I’m a little skeewampus myself so its befitting.
  7. Once you have all your letters stamped onto your pillow, allow adequate time to dry (it took mine about 30 minutes but follow the instructions on the paint you have) and then heat set with a dry iron if your paint so requires.  Most fabric paints will.
  8. If you printed your alphabet on a pillow cover then YOU’RE ALL DONE!!! But if you’re like me, you simply need to restuff and fluff your pillow and sew the seam closed.

And thats it my friends!! So EASY and cute isn’t it!  Here are some more tips and ideas you can use for this same project:

  • Dye your plain white pillow case with teabags and use sepia tones for your letter colors to make a vintagey fun alphabet pillow for your home or office.
  • Use foam letter stamps in different sizes and fonts to create a oober-eclectic alphabet pillow.
  • Try to highlight your little ones name in the alphabet by stamping out the letters of their name in the accent color.

What do you think?  Can you do it!? Of course you can!!! Have fun and let me know how yours turn out!  Stay tuned for my next tutorial “How to Make an Antique Clay Rose Necklace”. Tata for now and happy crafting everybody!

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