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Posts Tagged ‘spray paint’

The kids were down for naps and I had just hung up and put away all the laundry which meant everything I own was accessible.  I started looking around my closet with that really proud feeling that you get when you have NO DIRTY LAUNDRY.  You need to relish it because of course it won’t last long.  Anyway, I suddenly got the urge to try on outfits and see what I could come up with out of my wardrobe.  So, I thought I’d take pics so I can remember the ones I like.  So heres my little fashion show!  🙂  If you’d like to know my TOP 10 THRIFTING TIPS go here.

So what do you think of my dyed skirt, spray painted shoes, and thrifted threads?  🙂  I love my happy little closet.

P.S.  To see the black bib necklace tutorial go here.

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So I was staring at a pair of cream colored flats I bought at Target on clearance a while back for $5 thinking about how I have never worn them and wondering if I should donate them.  I’d hate to donate them.  They are seriously brand new.  And super cute and unique.  Then why don’t I wear them?  Hmmm…..  I looked around at my other shoes.  I have bright yellow heels, hot pink flats, teal espadrilles,…duh.  I don’t wear them because they’re boring!  Plain old creamy-nude.  Well then, I’ll just have to change that.  So I got online in search of a way to jazz up my boring little flats.  Thats when I discovered that you can actually SPRAY PAINT shoes.  And people had.  And it was awesome.

Having an abundance of spray paint in my garage, I got excited, grabbed my shoes, and headed out there to find the perfect color.  I picked a can of corally-salmon spray paint I had gotten at the Dollar Store months ago.  I LOVE coral lately and coral paint would be just the punch those shoes needed.  So heres what I did.

Cost:  $6 (thats for my shoes and the paint)  this of course will vary.

Supplies:  

  • A pair of shoes.  *TIP* Patent leather or faux patent leather (basically anything shiny) will probably not hold the paint as well and may end up cracking.  I recommend only painting shoes that are a faux suede-ish material (like mine), cotton-ish material, or satin.  That way the paint seeps into the fibers and doesn’t become super stiff and chip off.
  • Paper towels, rags, etc.  To stuff your shoes so the paint doesn’t get inside.
  • Tape.  If you want to tape off the sole and heel so that it stays the original color.
  • Spray primer.  (Recommended but may not be absolutely necessary)
  • A razor blade.  To take any over-spray off of the heel or sole.

1.  Stuff your shoes with rags/paper towels.  Make sure that any are you don’t want paint on is covered by towels or tape.

2.  Prime your shoes with a spray primer if you’d like before you paint them and let that dry.

3.  Spray paint shoes in sheer coats to avoid drips or puddles.  Spray on an even sheer coat, let dry, then spray on another, etc, until the shoes are completely covered in an even coat of paint.

4.  Let dry overnight before you wear them.

5.  Remove tape and rags and take off any over-spray by carefully scraping it with a razor blade (or fingernail).

6.  Enjoy your new shoes! 🙂

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I painted my kitchen chairs green last weekend and I’m LOVING the way they pop now against my new white tulip table!  I completely forgot to take close up before pics of the chairs and didn’t even think of doing a “how to” on them but I will give you the rundown on how I painted, distressed, stained them right now for those of you who might be wondering.  This is my own made up way to distress and paint wooden furniture.  There are tons of great sites out there with lots of professionals that really know what they’re doing but I’m impatient and cheap so I do things the short and sweet way.   These chairs were previously painted cream and distressed and stained.  To get them green I simply bought a spray primer (in grey to save on top coats), and green spray paint.  The paint I used is from Rust-Oleum and is called “Fern”.  It came in a “Gloss Protective Enamel” which worked great and will be extra durable to little hands and wipe downs.  I also bought a stain that has a built in polyeurothane coating.  I used Minwax PolyShades in Antique Walnut.  Staining over a painted piece of wood furniture gives an antique feel and gives the piece real character.  I wanted my old farmhouse style chairs to look old and worn because I thought the flat gloss paint color would look odd on that style of chair.  Anyway, heres what I did:

1.  I sanded the chairs slightly with a medium grit sandpaper.  Just to give them some tooth for the primer to hold on to.

2.  Then I sprayed a coat of the grey primer all over the chairs.  I wasn’t super concerned if they weren’t completely covered in opaque primer.

3.  Once the primer was dry, I sprayed the chairs with the green enamel spray paint.  If I weren’t doing these for myself I would’ve done several light coats until the chairs were covered.  But I am impatient and didn’t care about PERFECTION so I just slapped it on thick in one coat, being careful not to create drips.

4.  I let the freshly painted chairs dry overnight.

5.  The next day I took my sandpaper and lightly sanded some of the edges and divets and other areas to give it that distressed, worn look.  Some of the areas got sanded down to the original wood, others got sanded down to the cream paint color that was on them before.  My chairs were already “beat up” from when I had distressed and painted them the first time.  If you want a real distressed look, feel free to take an awl, hammers, rocks, chisels, etc. to your piece to distressed it and make it look worn and old.  Then, when you sand, pay special attention to all those little areas and make them come out by sanding them back a bit.

6.  After they were all sanded and distressed, I wiped them down really well with a damp cloth.  Then I got my stain out and started applying it one area at a time with a paper towel.  This is where you gotta move kinda quick.  I just dip my towel into the stain and start rubbing it on in the direction of the woodgrain (or where the woodgrain would go if you hadn’t painted it).  Rub it on and keep rubbing over it until you have applied the right amount.  It will start to dry and get tacky if you rub too much though so you might want to practice the look you’re going for on a scrap piece of wood first until you feel like you have it down.  I covered the entire chair this way with the stain, making sure I worked in sections and got in all the sanded back areas (the stain is what seals those parts that you’ve sanded back so they don’t continue to chip).  

7.  Let the stain dry at least overnight before using the furniture.  I waited a couple of days before I brought our chairs back in to use.

Anyway, thats how I did them. So sorry there are no pics!  But heres what they look like now in my kitchen:

You can see in the pic above how the stain creates variations in the paint color.  I love that.

And there they are!  I love them and am even more thrilled about the green since I found some awesome green dishes at the DOLLAR STORE last week!  I’ll have to take pics of those too because they’re seriously awesome and you’ll never believe they came from the Dollar Store.

P.S.  I sold my old table and 2 of the 4 chairs that came with my tulip table and actually ended up making a $10 profit out of the whole deal!  Which made my hubby very very happy! 🙂

Anyway, check back soon because I also made a fabulous new light fixture for my kitchen that you’re going to want to see the easy breezy tutorial for!  Heres a sneak peek!

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Yay!  I’m so excited to FINALLY have my craft room/office/music/guest room decorated and ready to use! Heres a bad picture that sort of gives you the idea of what it used to look like.  Sorry, I didn’t take many before pics.

As you can see,  this just shows you one side of the room where I housed all my craft junk.  Although it was somewhat organized into labeled bins, it looked super cluttered and chaotic.  The other side of the room had a small rickety computer desk and my keyboard on it.  And that was pretty much it.  Oh, by the way, if you read my sunburst mirror tutorial I described the “decorated” version of this room with the diarrhea wall color.  The pic above is before I painted it back then.  Sorry, I don’t have a pic of the ugly “decorated” room (I’m trying to block it from my memory).

Anyway, we really needed to be able to use this room as my craft room, our office, our music room to house my keyboard and our recording equipment, and a guest room for when family comes to visit from Idaho.  Thats a lot to ask of a relatively small space.  I sat in the room with a paper and pencil for like 20 minutes before I came up with a functional solution.  I decided the crappy desk had to go in order to free up that wall for a day-bed with trundle for guests.  That meant I’d have to reconfigure the shelving (thanks Daddy for putting it up for me!) and build a desk area on that side of the room.  This made my hubby happy when he saw it complete and realized how much extra desk space it created.  I also needed to fit my keyboard in there along with my drop-leaf craft table.  So the keyboard went on the wall by the closet door, I organized and put shelving in the closet to free up the floorspace which allows me now to be able to roll my craft table in there when I’m not using it, and I also brought an old bookcase that was in our garage in with some baskets to house guests’ items and create a little vanity area with a mirror and lamp.  And voila!! It is done.  And BONUS, my husband caved and agrees that it now looks much better and is much more functional.  Heres what it looks like now:

Awwww.  Much better.

The wooden day-bed and trundle were a $50 craigslist find and fit perfectly on the back wall.  I bought the white twin bedskirt at Target as well as the white comforter.

I REALLY needed some functional storage for all my craft supplies.  I found these photo boxes at Hobby Lobby for $4 each but I bought them on a 50% off day for $2 a piece.  Think outside the box (no pun intended) when looking for organizational supplies.  Office storage boxes like these were at least $6 each in the office supply section of the other stores I visited.   In the bottom left you can see some of my white stackable bins that I keep on the bottom shelf to store things I need often like scizzors, glue, markers, tools, etc, and I found them as a set of 3 at Walmart in the kitchen section.

Heres a peek at the “office” side.  Peyton really wanted to be in the picture.

A few Dollar Store clipboards got a makeover with ModPodge and scrapbook paper and keep our mail organized.

This frame was a quick project:  Take an old frame, paint it, attach wire or string across it in rows (I used push pins to hold it to the frame), and clip on small clothespins.  It makes a cute little photo/memo board.

This is my DIY mirror and a lamp that was needing a home.  I spray painted the lamp Jade from Krylon and sanded it back a little to distress it a bit.  I wanted a little place where guests could get ready and put some belongings.

These are the pen and ink sketches from this tutorial.  I bought the frames at the Dollar Store.

I layered tons of fun pillows on the day-bed which I just took from other places in my house.  I also took a paper lantern from my son’s room (he already had another lamp in there) and spruced it up a bit with some fabric flowers.  The tutorial for that is coming soon.  I bought an ugly painting a while back at a thrift store for $5 solely for the frame and painted the frame and a picture to go inside and hung it over the bed.

Here is a close up of the painting I did.  I wanted something kind of fun and quirky with just a POP of color.  I sketched the picture on a white canvas board (find canvas for really cheap at Walmart and BigLots) and then gave it a watercolored look with watered down acrylic craft paint.  I like that its imperfect and kind of whimsical.  The dusty blue-green fram makes it really pop off the white wall.  I spray painted the frame with Jade paint from Krylon and then glazed over it with watered down black craft paint and wiped it back before it dried with a paper towel.  Then I just set it all with a clear gloss spray lacquer.

I spruced up this lamp with singed fabric flowers I made and I think it really gives it a little more oomph.

This chalkboard was made by spray painting the old backing to a mirror (regular spray paint in a matte or satin finish works GREAT as a chalkboard on a smooth surface).  I decorated it with a white paint pen and hung it off of some silver chain I had.

And thats pretty much it!! It actually looks much better in person and I am loving the results!  I’m so excited to start using this room more now and my hubby is excited that craft junk will no longer be inhabiting the dining room table!  🙂

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I’m so excited to see that this blog has gained a little following!  I’m thrilled that I can share all my crazy projects with you and I love the comments and feedback as well as the ideas that you all are having for your own projects!  I would LOVE to see your versions these projects and would love to post them on here for others to become inspired!  If you have a completed project from one of these diy craft tutorials and would like to share it for us to see please shoot me an email with a pic of your project at catcart2@hotmail.com.

As for today’s project, I think you’re going to love it!  Especially if you liked the rose necklace tutorial a while back since this is more flower art with clay.  The difference is this is to adorn your walls!  A great way to add some springtime decorating to your home.  I had this idea when I walked through my entry way the other day and thought to myself how I’d like to spruce up my tree mural (if you’d like to learn how to do a simple wall mural you can find that tutorial under the decorating tab) for spring.  Here is a pic of my entry way with my tree mural:

I knew I wanted something 3-dimensional and temporary that I could easily “hang” on the branches for spring.  After hitting up the $Dollar Store I was inspired by thumb tacks and lightweight clay thinking I could easily configure those two things into some fun and colorful flowers for my tree.  But, if you don’t have a giant tree mural in your entry, you can still use these cute flower push-pins in a cluster around a mirror, scattered between springtime family photos, or year-round as a cute wall accent in a little-girls room.  Okay then, heres the breakdown:

Cost: $2-$10 depending on if you’re lucky enough to find the clay in the $Dollar Store or at the craft store (its about $6.50).

Supplies:

  • Sculpey Ultra Light clay. I only found it in white, which worked great for my since I ended up watercoloring it at the end anyway.
  • Thumb tacks.  I used white headed tacks.
  • Toothpick.
  • Oven.
  • Baking sheet.
  • Rolling pin.
  • Tin foil.
  • Flower cookie cutter.  I got mine at the $Dollar Store in a pack of 5 different cookie cutter designs.
  • Acrylic craft paint in desired color (optional).
  • Paint brush and water cup.

Most of this stuff you most likely have in your kitchen besides the clay.  I believe that Walmart also carries this clay in their craft section so check that out if you don’t have a craft store nearby.  Are you ready?  Lets make some flowers!

  1. Lay a couple feet of tin foil out onto a table.
  2. Knead the clay in your hands to soften it and make it pliable.  I only used less than 1/2 of the clay in the package to make 9 flowers.  Use as much as you want!  You can even vary the flowers shape and size if you have more than one flower cookie cutter.  Get creative and explore your options!
  3. Form the clay into a ball and roll it out with a rolling pin (I have a silicone rolling pin that didn’t have a problem sticking but I’m not sure if the clay would stick to a wood one.  If so, you can spread the clay out with your hands) to about 1/4 inch or so.  It doesn’t have to be consistently a 1/4 inch, but try to make it somewhat even.
  4. Grab your flower cookie cutter and begin cutting out your flowers like you would with sugar cookie dough.
  5. Peel away the extra clay and carefully transfer your clay flowers to your baking sheet.
  6. Take a toothpick and press lines halfway into the clay where the petals would be separated.You just want to make indentions with the toothpick, not separate petals.   This way the flower stays sturdy but you’re able to shape it a bit easier.
  7. Pull the petals upward and gently pinch along the indentions to create a 3-d more realistic looking flower.  Pull and curl the petals this way and that to make each one unique and more flower-like.Heres a look at all of mine after I shaped the petals:
  8. Poke a hole through the center of each flower with your toothpick.  This is where the push-pin will go when they’re done and ready to be hung up.  I also made small dots around the center of my flower but found later that the push-pin covers most of this detail, but you can add it if you’d like.
  9. Bake your pan of flowers in your oven according to the clay package recommendations.
  10. Once the flowers have baked and cooled you can do lots of different things.  Here are some ideas: You can leave them alone and white and hang them up; you can spray them with a high-gloss spray enamel to make them more modern and chic; you can spray paint them a color to match your decor; you can use glitter-glue to highlight the petals for a cute little girl’s room; you can “dye” them with a tea-bag dye to make them old and weathered looking; OR you can do what I did and use your acrylic craft paint and water to give them a watercolored look.  If you’re going to do the last option, READ ON!  If not, have fun creating your own flower pins anyway you’d like!
  11. Make a “paint pallet” by covering a plate in foil and squirting your paint color onto it.
  12. Dip your brush in water and water down your acrylic paint to the desired consistency.
  13. Paint your entire flower with your watery paint.
  14. With a paper towel, blot and wipe the flower from the center out a bit to remove some of the paint toward the center.  Leave a generous amount of the paint in pools along the edges of your petals.
  15. Touch up the edges by adding paint if needed.
  16. Let your flowers dry.
  17. Insert the push-pins through the hole in the flowers center (NOTE:  When rolling out your clay for your flowers, be sure to measure how thin to roll it out against your push-pin as you will need for a good portion of the pin to be coming through the back of your dry flower in order to adhere it to the wall).
  18. Stick your new flower push-pins into your walls however you feel so inclined!  How pretty!Yay!  That was FUN!  And now I have a million more ideas for this kind of project running through my head!!  I hope you liked this tutorial!  Check back soon for some spring FASHION tutorials like:  “How to Make an Elegant Spring Fabric Bouquet Necklace”, and “How to Make a Vintage Inspired Birdcage Veil”!  Happy crafting everyone!

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